Digest for rec.sport.football.college@googlegroups.com - 25 updates in 11 topics

Monday, July 10, 2017

"the_andrew_smith@yahoo.com" <agavinsmith@gmail.com>: Jul 10 07:00AM -0700

The sound of the compressors in my front yard as they lay fiber in my neighborhood.
 
Suck it Chatham County Hippies!!
 
I'm going to be posting to RSFC 24/7 at high(er) speed !!
xyzzy <xyzzy.dude@gmail.com>: Jul 10 07:02AM -0700

> The sound of the compressors in my front yard as they lay fiber in my neighborhood.
 
> Suck it Chatham County Hippies!!
 
Some Chatham County hippies say FU.
 
http://chathamjournal.com/2017/07/03/randolph-telephone-telecommunications-bringing-high-speed-internet-silk-hope-community/
 
(doesn't cover me though)

> I'm going to be posting to RSFC 24/7 at high(er) speed !!
 
You can poast to usenet just as fast on dial-up. Don't ask me how I know.
"Con Reeder, unhyphenated American" <constance@duxmail.com>: Jul 10 09:07AM -0500

> The sound of the compressors in my front yard as they lay fiber in my neighborhood.
 
> Suck it Chatham County Hippies!!
 
> I'm going to be posting to RSFC 24/7 at high(er) speed !!
 
Will it be enough bandwidth to start putting some context in your posts?
 
--
The problem with Internet quotations is that many of them
are not genuine. -- Abraham Lincoln
RoddyMcCorley <Roddy.McCorley@verizon.net>: Jul 10 12:26AM -0400

On 7/9/2017 6:42 PM, J. Hugh Sullivan wrote:
 
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> http://www.avg.com
 
And if that person was your son, daughter, grandson or granddaughter?
 
Valid questions for society.
 
Are we empowering opiate abusers by rescuing them with naloxone?
 
--
False words are not only evil in themselves, but they infect the soul
with evil.
 
Pennsylvania - Tá sé difriúil anseo.
Ken Olson <kolson@freedomnet.org>: Jul 10 01:21AM -0400

On 7/10/2017 12:26 AM, RoddyMcCorley wrote:
 
> And if that person was your son, daughter, grandson or granddaughter?
 
> Valid questions for society.
 
> Are we empowering opiate abusers by rescuing them with naloxone?
 
My gut instinct is to save them and try to help them. I suggest we let
them consume cannabis. Now, if opiate recovery via naloxone becomes a
hobby for them we may not continue to be so accomodating.
michael anderson <mianderson79@gmail.com>: Jul 09 11:06PM -0700

On Sunday, July 9, 2017 at 11:26:50 PM UTC-5, RoddyMcCorley wrote:
 
> And if that person was your son, daughter, grandson or granddaughter?
 
> Valid questions for society.
 
> Are we empowering opiate abusers by rescuing them with naloxone?
 
it doesn't seem you know much about addiction....
 
the guy shooting heroin right now is most definately not saying to himself "I know this is sorta dangerous, but my buddy has some naloxone to give me if I start to nod off too much and thats why I feel ok about doing it"....
 
michael anderson <mianderson79@gmail.com>: Jul 09 11:09PM -0700

On Monday, July 10, 2017 at 12:21:53 AM UTC-5, Ken Olson wrote:
 
> My gut instinct is to save them and try to help them. I suggest we let
> them consume cannabis. Now, if opiate recovery via naloxone becomes a
> hobby for them we may not continue to be so accomodating.
 
who is 'we' and who gave you the power to decide whether this population gets 'accomodated' with naloxone or not? And please don't say you mean we as taxpayers....
Eagle@bellsouth.net (J. Hugh Sullivan): Jul 10 12:25PM

On Mon, 10 Jul 2017 00:26:46 -0400, RoddyMcCorley
>> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
>> http://www.avg.com
 
>And if that person was your son, daughter, grandson or granddaughter?
 
I would not have a different answer for them if they did not meet
expectations. But the love doesn't change.
 
We have created a group of people who not only find failure acceptable
but subsidize it.
 
>Valid questions for society.
 
We know society's answer.
 
>Are we empowering opiate abusers by rescuing them with naloxone?
 
It's easier to be a circus aerialist when there is a net below.
 
There is no good answer. But my basic philosophy is that those who
fail should pay the penalty. It's life's version of Russian Roulette.
 
Hugh
michael anderson <mianderson79@gmail.com>: Jul 10 07:05AM -0700

On Monday, July 10, 2017 at 7:25:09 AM UTC-5, J. Hugh Sullivan wrote:
 
> It's easier to be a circus aerialist when there is a net below.
 
> There is no good answer. But my basic philosophy is that those who
> fail should pay the penalty. It's life's version of Russian Roulette.
 
why not apply this to everything and health care? Driving above the speed limit and have a wreck? Sorry, no medical treatment- have to pay the penalty for driving too fast and having an accident. A smoker who gets cancer? Sorry, no treatment...gotta pay the penalty for smoking. And on and on and on....
 
 
xyzzy <xyzzy.dude@gmail.com>: Jul 10 07:06AM -0700


> And you really shouldn't because as far as drugs go, bud is roughly one gazillion times less dangerous than alcohol. I say that as someone who drinks.
 
> Seriously, I did the math on that.
 
> Cheers.
 
My brother did a lot of drugs including pot in his college years.
 
He says the stuff we get today is 10x stronger and not really comparable to what we remember.
 
He also says that one of the problems with the legalization debate is people his and my age with nostalgic memories of our college pot, who really don't understand how much stronger it is today, are helping drive it.
 
Can't say I agree or disagree since I never was really into that scene. But it's an interesting perspective from someone who knows more about it than I do.
michael anderson <mianderson79@gmail.com>: Jul 09 09:29PM -0700

> Neither belong in the hall. The only HOF (or HOF bound) pitcher in the top 10 in similarity scores to Schilling is Smoltz (10th) and he got in on a gift to an interrupted career and a resurrection as a closer.
 
his time as a closer didnt have a lot of value overall. We're talking about a season's worth of really quality starting pitching there.
 
And I would argue that Smoltz actually got in because he has so many big postseason moments. He was known as a huge big game/postseason pitcher....now how much that rep should count in getting a pitcher into the hof is a fair argument? But that was what got smoltz in.
 
And schilling is the *one* contemporary to smoltz who was also known as an equally huge big game pitcher with the same level of postseason/huge moment success. Maybe even more.
 
Jack Morris has this as well of course, but morris isn't close to a true peer in terms of performance to smoltz and schilling. He has an era+ of 105 for god sakes(if you dont like era+ pick some other metric)
 
Would I vote Schilling in? Probably, although it's not a huge tragedy if he doesnt get in.
 
But do I think the writers are kinda screwing him over based on *their own standards*? Sure....by the numbers he is a bubble hof guy, and his intangibles that HOF voters love(like smoltz) are off the charts good.
Eagle@bellsouth.net (J. Hugh Sullivan): Jul 10 11:45AM

On Sun, 9 Jul 2017 22:21:07 -0400, Ken Olson <kolson@freedomnet.org>
wrote:
 
>> http://www.avg.com
 
>They need a section for guys that had the stats to get in, but had other
>factors that stopped their admission.
 
Now that's an interesting concept. We know who they are but they don't
have a group name.
 
Hugh
"the_andrew_smith@yahoo.com" <agavinsmith@gmail.com>: Jul 10 07:04AM -0700

I love arguments about the baseball hall of (sometimes) statistics, (sometimes) fame, (sometimes) friendliness to writers, (sometimes) <insert other issue>, & Fame
"the_andrew_smith@yahoo.com" <agavinsmith@gmail.com>: Jul 10 05:39AM -0700

http://www.nysun.com/national/bezos-slim-and-buffett-billionaires-pleading/90026/
"wolfie" <bgbdwolf@gte.net>: Jul 10 01:02AM -0400

"Con Reeder, unhyphenated American" wrote
 
> As government becomes a larger and larger part of the spending
> pie, we have poorer and poorer productivity and many of these
> negative effects.
 
Government spending as "part of the spending pie" is lower than
it was in 1992. Other than the three years after the crash, that's
been true. Government spending is and has been largely flat as a
percentage of GDP.
Eagle@bellsouth.net (J. Hugh Sullivan): Jul 10 12:30PM

>it was in 1992. Other than the three years after the crash, that's
>been true. Government spending is and has been largely flat as a
>percentage of GDP.
 
And I'm sure you would say government is in good shape for the shape
it is in.
 
The flaw in both is the basic premise, i. e., we have to have that
much government to succeed.
 
Hugh
 
 
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tim.vanwagonerspam@gmail.com: Jul 09 09:43PM -0700

Its is the entire frame if the argument that gave it away and the snotty way you refer to beaurocrats in the government. What I'm talking about has nothing to do with centralization. It has do do with how the government pays for what portion they pay and those experiments forming the models that the private sector companies will follow - voluntarily. They increasing have more incentive to change, only because they have saturated what the employers are willing to pay for their employees coverage and the increased costs are now being turned onto the secondary customers (you and me). But until lately, they've not been all that concerned with holding down costs because they could pass them onto the primary customers (employers) and the increased spliff they get was great for them. And as long as the government is dramatically warping the market through its involvement and they favorable tax status of the current scheme, your solution is theoretical hogwash. There is absolutely no role for the consumer to drive the prices when the consumer does not really pay those prices at the time of consumption. The only thing that would start to help in that matter would be for much higher deductibles, but as we see with Obamacare, those are both unpopular, and the biggest complaint that the Republicans have against the scheme.
 
And my skin in the game is simply helping rural healthcare survive. But because of that, I have lots of employees trying to help private practices adapt to whatever changes they have to make to survive. I would much rather they could spend that time helping improve patient care instead, so I don't benefit from the system like you think. However, because of what I do, I actually know what is occurring rather than knee jerking about based upon the perception that government=bad, free-market=good or vice versa. Since it is brutally obvious that Americans absolutely do not want a free market health care system, we have to work with the reality of what exists. And in that real world, regardless of what you think, the government IS the innovator at the moment because they have the most at stake and the biggest incentive to hold down costs.
 
believe me, I would not want to see single payer in the U.S. but pragmatically I know it is inevitable. If we make it until 2025 without it, I'll be surprised. The only thing propping up the current non-government side of the system up is tax policy. If they treated the employee compensation for healthcare like they did any other employee compensation, the entire system would collapse.
"the_andrew_smith@yahoo.com" <agavinsmith@gmail.com>: Jul 10 04:38AM -0700

"Too bad we're not getting the subsequent health improvement. for example, a drug or device manufacturing company now just has to show that their product is effective to be included in the standard of care and thus able to be reimbursed for. But it doesn't take enough account anything like DALY or QALY/$, so that new heartburn drug that costs 5x as much but is only 2% more effective and doesn't change the patient's quality of life is covered. Since the patient might bear the same cost no matter the bottom line to Medicare,..."
 
Medicare - the government- is the problem here. Insurance companies compete on the open market and their priority is maintaining a better or acceptable cost/benefit ratio compared to the competition in the market. Medicare has no such compunction.
 
As to health improvement, once again, the government has failed us. We're living longer these days, yet our largest therapeutic areas of concern are cardiology and obesity. These issues can directly be linked to the ridiculously incorrect government dietary standards to eat more carbs and fewer fats.
 
If the government could extricate itself from quite a lot "healthcare" we'd all be the better for it.
Eagle@bellsouth.net (J. Hugh Sullivan): Jul 10 12:09PM

On Sun, 9 Jul 2017 21:43:18 -0700 (PDT), tim.vanwagonerspam@gmail.com
wrote:
 
>Its is the entire frame if the argument that gave it away and the snotty wa=
>y you refer to beaurocrats in the government.
 
...as opposed to your position which, to me, appears to be "we don't
have enough talent to do it without government help". That's the
position of all socialists and people who can't compete.
 
Rural people didn't die in the 30s, 40s and 50s because of the lack of
insurance and advocates of socialistic policies.
 
Actually, in the late 40s I enjoyed the excess produce given to us by
a country doctor and his doctor son. Those vegetables were payment by
rural people who didn't have the cash. And they sat in the same
waiting room with those who could pay. It worked when people were
really competent.
 
Hugh
 
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"Con Reeder, unhyphenated American" <constance@duxmail.com>: Jul 10 07:28AM -0500

I'll pick out one sentence from your paragraph of preconceived notions:
 
> There is absolutely no role for the consumer to drive the prices
> when the consumer does not really pay those prices at the time of
> consumption.
 
That's rather the point, isn't it? When costs are not transparent,
how can they determine what they are paying?
 
> would be for much higher deductibles, but as we see with Obamacare,
> those are both unpopular, and the biggest complaint that the
> Republicans have against the scheme.
 
Deductibles are already high. I am "lucky" to have insurance that
isn't the boa-constricter network Obamacare, and my deductible is
$3200, my out-of-pocket maximum $6500, and my premium 13,000 a year.
Obamacare would have similar provisions and a premium only slightly
less, at the cost of a network that is paper thin.
 
I'd much rather have a $8,000 deductible and a $6,000 premium, along
with the ability to choose care that minimized my outlay. And I'm old
and sick. If I were young, I'd love to have the chance to minimize
my costs by patronizing clinics, choosing which drug to treat with,
and using an HSA.
 
 
> And my skin in the game is simply helping rural healthcare survive.
 
Altruism personified.
 
> government=bad, free-market=good or vice versa. Since it is brutally
> obvious that Americans absolutely do not want a free market health
> care system, we have to work with the reality of what exists.
 
"My side's agenda is inevitable, so get on with it." Americans don't
want a free market health care system because the scaremongers of the
Democratic party accuse the opposition of improper motives. We have the
best health care in the world, and I want it to stay that way, not descend
to where Canada and Britain are. Where will the Canadian premier come
for his heart procedures if we go single-payer?
 
 
> And in that real world, regardless of what you think, the government
> IS the innovator at the moment because they have the most at stake
> and the biggest incentive to hold down costs.
 
Bullshit. The only incentive they have is to get elected and keep
their jobs.
 
> non-government side of the system up is tax policy. If they treated
> the employee compensation for healthcare like they did any other
> employee compensation, the entire system would collapse.
 
I think you are myopic. You can have the field, I'm done.
 
--
There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale
returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
-- Mark Twain
Eagle@bellsouth.net (J. Hugh Sullivan): Jul 10 12:10PM

On Sun, 9 Jul 2017 22:18:53 -0400, Ken Olson <kolson@freedomnet.org>
wrote:
 
 
>> I'm listening to Immigrant Song right now!
 
>I really love that song. My wife doesn't because I turn it TOO LOUD, at
>least that's what I read from her lips.
 
Don't get a hearing. You would probably change your will.
 
Hugh
 
 
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irishranger317@gmail.com: Jul 10 04:57AM -0700

The following article was written by Bill O'Reilly on 7/7/2017. It illustrates the damage being inflicted
on European countries as a result of idiotic left wing liberal immigration policies.
 
"A stunning – and stunningly disturbing - event took place this past weekend. But unless you were scouring the news very carefully, chances are you didn't even hear of it.
 
The annual Bravalla Festival, one of the most popular summer music concerts in Sweden, was abruptly canceled. There will be no festival next year. Or ever.
 
Given that tens of thousands of tickets were sold, the problem was not attendance. Nor was there any difficulty booking big-name rap and rock stars. No, this festival was canceled because of something far more ominous – Bravalla has become synonymous with rape and sexual assault.
 
Festival officials, as they announced the end of Bravalla, complained that "certain men" don't know how to behave. You might wonder if those "certain men" are strapping blonde Swedes with names like Erik, Viktor, and Gustav. But in fact, the assailants are allegedly immigrants from the Middle East, North Africa, and other predominantly Muslim areas of the world.
 
One year ago the Bravalla Festival gained a measure of infamy when police reported five rapes and a dozen cases of molestation. The story got minor coverage in some media outlets, including the New York Times, which described the assailants as "foreigners" and "refugees." Predictably, the Times also warned of a "far-right" backlash.
 
This year the situation was even more sickening, with four reported rapes and 23 instances of sexual assault. And the Times? The "paper of record" chose to run a brief Associated Press dispatch noting that the festival has been shut down. Nowhere was there any mention that Muslim immigrants were the likely perps.
 
Sweden, like many European socialist paradises, has been in a state of deep denial about its refugee crisis. If you believe authorities and tourism officials, immigrants are fitting in quite nicely in the world's most liberal nation. But what about those rumors of "no-go zones," where crime is rampant and where police fear to tread? Well, we're assured that's just "fake news" perpetrated by anti-immigrant groups.
 
But earlier this year a courageous British reporter named Katie Hopkins decided to take a look for herself. She ventured into some of Sweden's imaginary "no-go zones" and spoke with women who are absolutely terrified of going out alone, day or night. They know that crossing onto the wrong street in some cities is an invitation to harassment, assault, even rape.
 
These women are also afraid of feminists and liberals, who accuse them of being racists if they speak the truth. Hopkins wrote this about one woman she met in Stockholm: "The migrant men scare her. But it is the Swedish women who have silenced her."
 
Bravalla is not the only music festival where women are in jeopardy. There were dozens of rapes and assaults at another concert a few years ago, allegedly committed by young Afghan men who had been embraced by Sweden's outstretched arms.
 
And of course it's not just Sweden. In Germany, New Year's Eve of 2016 was marred by sexual assaults and rapes in many cities. Police reported that more than one-thousand women were victimized by hordes of young men. Again, the perps weren't Wolfgang, Hans, und Dieter. They were described by the women as men of "Arab or North African appearance."
 
Governments in Europe and a compliant media do their best to ignore the unending and escalating threat of violence. It simply does not fit the liberal narrative, which dictates that all cultures and all religions are pretty much the same. But reality has a very harsh way of prevailing over fantasy.
 
Sweden has the highest rate of immigration in Europe, having taken in tens of thousands of refugees from Syria, Somalia, and elsewhere. So you can think of the country as the canary in the coal mine. That proverbial canary is now gasping for air as European bureaucrats turn a blind eye.
 
Most Swedes still embrace their reputation for tolerance and liberalism. Many even seem quite willing to sacrifice a music festival or two if that's what it takes to display their virtue. And they willingly pay exorbitant taxes to subsidize refugees who despise Sweden's libertine culture and sexual permissiveness.
 
Let's put it this way: The world's most tolerant people are inviting the world's most intolerant people into their nation and their cities. The Swedes believe it's a noble experiment. But whether noble or foolish, it is an experiment doomed to fail.
 
The Bravalla Music Festival was just one casualty. There will be many more. Ironically, the festival urged fans to "choke hatred and violence and let the music win." Well, hatred and violence won and the music lost.
 
In the process, another small part of Europe has vanished, thanks to cowardly ideologues who so desperately cling to their open-border, one-world fantasies. A once-great continent and its cultures are slowly dying. To be more accurate, they are committing suicide."
 
Irish Mike
Eagle@bellsouth.net (J. Hugh Sullivan): Jul 10 11:55AM

On Sun, 9 Jul 2017 22:16:48 -0400, Ken Olson <kolson@freedomnet.org>
wrote:
 
>> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
>> http://www.avg.com
 
>I always figured that dnrapp is a sock for mia.
 
Heretofore he seemed pretty non-controversial to me and his comments
were usually interesting. I wish he had not stepped on that land mine.
 
Hugh
Eagle@bellsouth.net (J. Hugh Sullivan): Jul 10 11:52AM

On Sun, 9 Jul 2017 16:48:51 -0700 (PDT), Some dued
 
>Clearly you are not.
 
I must admit that, at my age, I'm getting closer to the inferior state
every day.
 
I can't imagine how you, wolfie and Fartball reached it so fast.
 
Hugh
 
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Eagle@bellsouth.net (J. Hugh Sullivan): Jul 10 11:50AM

On Sun, 9 Jul 2017 22:15:44 -0400, Ken Olson <kolson@freedomnet.org>
wrote:
 
 
>> Mike
 
>People that served their country and community honorably and were
>gainfully employed for decades in their chosen field?
 
There is considerable evidence that he is not that far along in school
yet.
 
Hugh
 
 
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