Digest for rec.sport.golf@googlegroups.com - 25 updates in 11 topics

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Moderate <nospam@noemail.com>: Jun 06 11:31AM -0500

> leaked it has been arrested...
 
> ...which wouldn't have happened if the document weren't actually from
> the NSA.
 
Cite
--
Moderate <nospam@noemail.com>: Jun 06 12:21PM -0500

> detailed U.S. government account of Russian interference in the election
> that has yet come to light.'
 
> <https://theintercept.com/2017/06/05/top-secret-nsa-report-details-russian-hacking-effort-days-before-2016-election/>
 
This is just stupid. Every server gets hit with this stuff almost
daily.
--
Moderate <nospam@noemail.com>: Jun 06 01:17PM -0500

>> daily.
 
> Then our intelligence agencies should just ignore it, right? THAT
> would be stupid.
 
I wish they would stop all phishing and ransomware emails.
--
Moderate <nospam@noemail.com>: Jun 06 01:19PM -0500


> And there are thousands of motor vehicle accidents every day too...
 
> ...but that doesn't mean that someone in particular can't use a car to
> deliberately kill someone else.
 
Nobody died. Your analogy is absurd, like all your posts.
--
Moderate <nospam@noemail.com>: Jun 06 01:37PM -0500


> You tried to suggest that because such things are going on all the time
> that that somehow makes an attack by RUSSIA on the companies that make
> your voting machines unimportant.
 
It is important that it happens to everyone.
--
Alan Baker <alangbaker@telus.net>: Jun 06 09:08AM -0700

On 2017-06-05 9:38 PM, Alan Baker wrote:
> detailed U.S. government account of Russian interference in the election
> that has yet come to light.'
 
> <https://theintercept.com/2017/06/05/top-secret-nsa-report-details-russian-hacking-effort-days-before-2016-election/>
 
And this leak has been corroborated by the fact that the person who
leaked it has been arrested...
 
...which wouldn't have happened if the document weren't actually from
the NSA.
Alan Baker <alangbaker@telus.net>: Jun 06 09:39AM -0700

On 2017-06-06 9:31 AM, Moderate wrote:
 
>> ...which wouldn't have happened if the document weren't actually from
>> the NSA.
 
> Cite
 
<http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-40168417>
 
<http://www.torontosun.com/2017/06/06/us-contractor-reality-winner-arrested-in-leak-of-nsa-report-on-election-hacking-by-russia>
 
And for our special snowflake, Greg:
 
<http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/feds-arrest-nsa-contractor-leak-top-secret-russia-document-n768561>
Alan Baker <alangbaker@telus.net>: Jun 06 10:27AM -0700

On 2017-06-06 10:21 AM, Moderate wrote:
 
>> <https://theintercept.com/2017/06/05/top-secret-nsa-report-details-russian-hacking-effort-days-before-2016-election/>
 
> This is just stupid. Every server gets hit with this stuff almost
> daily.
 
And there are thousands of motor vehicle accidents every day too...
 
...but that doesn't mean that someone in particular can't use a car to
deliberately kill someone else.
BK@Onramp.net: Jun 06 12:28PM -0500

On Tue, 6 Jun 2017 12:21:06 -0500 (CDT), Moderate <nospam@noemail.com>
wrote:
 
 
>> <https://theintercept.com/2017/06/05/top-secret-nsa-report-details-russian-hacking-effort-days-before-2016-election/>
 
>This is just stupid. Every server gets hit with this stuff almost
> daily.
 
Then our intelligence agencies should just ignore it, right? THAT
would be stupid.
Alan Baker <alangbaker@telus.net>: Jun 06 11:27AM -0700

On 2017-06-06 11:19 AM, Moderate wrote:
 
>> ...but that doesn't mean that someone in particular can't use a car to
>> deliberately kill someone else.
 
> Nobody died. Your analogy is absurd, like all your posts.
 
No.
 
You tried to suggest that because such things are going on all the time
that that somehow makes an attack by RUSSIA on the companies that make
your voting machines unimportant.
Nomen Nescio <nobody@dizum.com>: Jun 06 08:26PM +0200

Look up bill 89 in canada.
 
Sick perverts on charge it seems.
 
Not in my home, try it!
Nomen Nescio <nobody@dizum.com>: Jun 06 08:15PM +0200

Move to canada.
 
You will be most welcome.
 
Sick fucks, keep your bill 89.
Nomen Nescio <nobody@dizum.com>: Jun 06 08:04PM +0200

WHAT A DECADENT NATION.
 
LOOK WHAT YOU HAVE BECOME.
 
WONDER WHAT THE RAT HAS TO SAY. IS HE CAPABLE OF INDEPENDENT THOUGHT?
Nomen Nescio <nobody@dizum.com>: Jun 06 08:04PM +0200

Research bill 89
 
Good job shit stain!
 
Proud of this?
"Scott M. Kozel" <kozelsm@comcast.net>: Jun 06 03:02AM -0700

On Monday, June 5, 2017 at 10:23:16 PM UTC-4, Alan Baker wrote:
> definitely times where even a 60 degree wedge wasn't something I could
> hit well.
 
> Everyone's different. YMMV.
 
I do have 4 wedges including a 60 degree lob wedge. I find it useful
for the occasional short pitch shot such as clearing a bunker that is
next to the green.
 
For the more frequent high chip shots I use the 52 degree approach
wedge, as that has about the right amount of loft for that shot.
Alan Baker <alangbaker@telus.net>: Jun 06 07:23AM -0700

On 2017-06-06 3:02 AM, Scott M. Kozel wrote:
> next to the green.
 
> For the more frequent high chip shots I use the 52 degree approach
> wedge, as that has about the right amount of loft for that shot.
 
Sounds pretty much like what I carry: Titleist AP2 pitching wedged, low
bounce Cleveland 52, 56 degree sand wedge, 60 degree.
 
As I said, even when I was playing my best, the 60 degree wedge was the
club most that occasionally gave me trouble.
"Scott M. Kozel" <kozelsm@comcast.net>: Jun 06 09:01AM -0700

On Tuesday, June 6, 2017 at 10:23:17 AM UTC-4, Alan Baker wrote:
> bounce Cleveland 52, 56 degree sand wedge, 60 degree.
 
> As I said, even when I was playing my best, the 60 degree wedge was the
> club most that occasionally gave me trouble.
 
It is an interesting club to hit, an interesting shot, can be a
valuable shot when needed, and fun to practice with.
 
Just out of curiosity I will probably get the high lob wedge, just to
see what it can do and whether it might be valuable.
Dene <gdstrue@aol.com>: Jun 06 09:59AM -0700

On 6/5/2017 7:13 PM, Scott M. Kozel wrote:
> Is this a useful club for the mid-handicapper (upper 80s)?
 
I'm a current 9 hdcp. and I only carry 3 wedges..PW, SW, and a 56
degree. I simply open the 56 wedge when I want to flop a shot. Close
it when I want to bump and run.
 
So...I say no.
Carbon <nobrac@nospam.tampabay.rr.com>: Jun 06 01:44PM -0400

On 06/06/2017 12:59 PM, Dene wrote:
> degree. I simply open the 56 wedge when I want to flop a shot. Close
> it when I want to bump and run.
 
> So...I say no.

I have a PW, a 56 degree SW with a lot of bounce for the sand, and a 60 with less bounce for trick shots, amusement, blading the ball 100 yards past the green, etc.
 
No as well, at least for me.
Alan Baker <alangbaker@telus.net>: Jun 06 10:06AM -0700

I saw this in another group, and I thought you wingnuts should see it too:
 
'Others mentioned potential conflicts with clients of their firms, such
as financial institutions that have already received subpoenas relating
to potential money-laundering issues that are part of the investigation.'
 
<https://www.yahoo.com/news/four-top-law-firms-turned-requests-represent-trump-122423972.html>
 
For an investigation you claim is "fake"—and somehow blame on the
Democrats despite it being carried out by an FBI formerly led (until the
orange idiot fired him for it) by a Republican director, there's an
awful lot of "there" there.
 
:-)
BK@Onramp.net: Jun 06 12:26PM -0500

On Tue, 6 Jun 2017 10:06:48 -0700, Alan Baker <alangbaker@telus.net>
wrote:
 
>orange idiot fired him for it) by a Republican director, there's an
>awful lot of "there" there.
 
>:-)
 
One quote about lawyers turning down Trump's case that got a laugh
from me was " The guy won't pay and he won't listen.'"
Alan Baker <alangbaker@telus.net>: Jun 06 10:31AM -0700


>> :-)
 
> One quote about lawyers turning down Trump's case that got a laugh
> from me was " The guy won't pay and he won't listen.'"
 
This article is pretty good, too:
 
'The result is that Trump is trying to use his divorce attorney Marc
Kasowitz to represent him in a counterintelligence investigation that
has the highest political stakes. And that's an eighth reason why the
big firms won't touch the case. Mike Allen explains:
 
...
 
He's stuck with a guy who specializes in pre-nuptial agreements and who
represented him in his Trump University fraud cases.
 
"The president's chief lawyer now in charge of the case is Marc E.
Kasowitz, a tough New York civil litigator who for years has
aggressively represented Trump in multiple business and public relations
disputes — often with threats of countersuits and menacing public
statements — but who has little experience dealing with complex
congressional and Justice Department investigations that are inevitably
influenced by media coverage and public opinion."'
 
<http://washingtonmonthly.com/2017/06/06/why-no-lawyers-will-represent-trump/>
Nomen Nescio <nobody@dizum.com>: Jun 06 06:58PM +0200

Proof what assholes Canadians are.
 
 
Louisiana my home, we would not tolerate what you pigs do.
 
what a hole, with your taxes, your weather, the cost of living, and retarded liberals.
Nomen Nescio <nobody@dizum.com>: Jun 06 06:26PM +0200

Research bill 89.
 
What say you balding troll ?
Alan Baker <alangbaker@telus.net>: Jun 06 08:53AM -0700

'In an announcement that included near-verbatim quotes from several
aviation Big Four lobbyists, Donald Trump announced plans to shut down
the FAA and let the incumbents regulate themselves.'
 
<http://boingboing.net/2017/06/06/what-could-go-wrong.html>
 
'If Trump can stop tweeting horrible things long enough to let the
lobbyist-funded swamp-dwellers in his cabinet and Congress make this
happen, there will be two enormous problems with this arrangement. First
and most obviously, the industry will cut corners on safety and people
will die. Corporations are pathological externalizers: any costs that
can be put off to other parties are. That's why corporations pollute,
kill their workers, and defraud their customers: in the
next-quarter-focused version of shareholder capitalism, anything that
adds an extra dollar to this quarter's balance sheet is the duty of
management.
 
But the second problem is, if anything, more pernicious: letting a
highly concentrated industry regulate itself inevitably leads to rules
that prevent any new competitors from appearing on the scene. New
entrants will come up with practices that are different, and potentially
superior, to the ones in place now -- practices that are difficult to
match if you've already sunk billions into the old system. By refusing
to consider these practices on their merits -- and simply ruling them
out on the basis that they're not compliant with the old rules -- the
incumbents can create a system where any improvement is literally illegal.
 
These two are a deadly combination. Without competition from new
entrants, the incumbents can deliver less and less value to the country
(and retain more and more value for their shareholders) without the fear
of losing customers to an upstart. Privatizing aviation safety allows
the Big Four to treat us worse and make us less safe, and removes any
floor on such bad behavior by eliminating competition.'
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