Digest for rec.sport.football.college@googlegroups.com - 25 updates in 11 topics

Friday, May 5, 2017

"the_andrew_smith@yahoo.com" <agavinsmith@gmail.com>: May 05 04:00AM -0700

This was Sheetz. Real gas? Is it a new store promotion?
xyzzy <xyzzy.dude@gmail.com>: May 05 05:56AM -0700

> This was Sheetz. Real gas? Is it a new store promotion?
 
Maybe. It's a location I don't remember seeing before, but I also don't go that way often.
"Con Reeder, unhyphenated American" <constance@duxmail.com>: May 05 08:06AM -0500

> On Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 3:08:21 PM UTC-4, the_andr...@yahoo.com wrote:
>> For E-CornLiquor Gasoline.
 
> Sheetz is selling the real thing for $1.999 at a station in Durham.
 
Paid 1.85 Tuesday for unleaded in a little town in South Carolina.
I suspect we aren't going to see much of a "benzene hangover" this
year up north, with oil prices heading south again.
 
--
"I find that a great part of the information I have was acquired
by looking up something and finding something else on the way."
-- Franklin Pierce Adams
"the_andrew_smith@yahoo.com" <agavinsmith@gmail.com>: May 05 09:19AM -0700

I think sakerlina still eschews the federal highway subsidy.
"the_andrew_smith@yahoo.com" <agavinsmith@gmail.com>: May 05 03:59AM -0700

I asked the same question. He's only gotten it up to 120.
xyzzy <xyzzy.dude@gmail.com>: May 05 05:57AM -0700

On Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 9:35:31 PM UTC-4, Some dued wrote:
> Does it do 185?
 
Someone around here has a Maserati with a vanity plate "DOES 185"
"the_andrew_smith@yahoo.com" <agavinsmith@gmail.com>: May 05 05:58AM -0700

That's good.
 
Saw a mustang last week with "UZURSGNL".
JGibson <james.m.gibson@gmail.com>: May 05 06:37AM -0700

On Friday, May 5, 2017 at 8:57:01 AM UTC-4, xyzzy wrote:
> On Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 9:35:31 PM UTC-4, Some dued wrote:
> > Does it do 185?
 
> Someone around here has a Maserati with a vanity plate "DOES 185"
 
Better be careful. He'll probably lose his license and then won't drive.
"the_andrew_smith@yahoo.com" <agavinsmith@gmail.com>: May 05 09:18AM -0700

And I'm the one with an accountant.
"the_andrew_smith@yahoo.com" <agavinsmith@gmail.com>: May 05 09:17AM -0700

"Civil rights are the rights of individuals to receive equal treatment, including disabilities and pre-existing conditions. @AmericanCancer"
 
I read this today on Twitter.
 
There is no right to healthcare in the constitution.
 
Why should there be?
michael anderson <mianderson79@gmail.com>: May 05 06:50AM -0700

Did I read that right that a typical American airlines pilot makes 86k? And flight attendant only 40k? I had assumed an American airlines pilot would make at least 275-325....damn...
xyzzy <xyzzy.dude@gmail.com>: May 05 08:57AM -0700

Senior captains flying oceanic routes can get into the 200s. But for every one of them there are probably 10 domestic MD-80 or 737 first officers making a lot less.
 
But I agree even with that $86k seems low. Unless America Eagle pilots are included in that number. Those guys make peanuts.
Eagle@bellsouth.net (J. Hugh Sullivan): May 05 03:53PM

>> their masters. The difference is merely technical.
 
>Not really. You and your idiots would just like to see that Amendment eliminated, as it's the only way you'd be able to get most of the country back to work in any capacity.
 
>Mike
 
Which Amendment covers payments to worthless people?
 
Hugh
 
 
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Futbol Phan <sgzphd@gmail.com>: May 05 08:20AM -0700

Bud Light? Are you kidding me? At least they could celebrate the elimination of health care for millions with some decent cerveza.
JGibson <james.m.gibson@gmail.com>: May 05 08:34AM -0700

On Friday, May 5, 2017 at 11:20:26 AM UTC-4, Futbol Phan wrote:
> Bud Light? Are you kidding me? At least they could celebrate the elimination of health care for millions with some decent cerveza.
 
A foreign beer? Are you kidding me? They are representing real America.
michael anderson <mianderson79@gmail.com>: May 05 06:34AM -0700

I don't get the lack of transparency complaint. Prices are plenty transparent. It's like when you go to an auto body shop- Geicos contract is going to reimburse different than progressives contract which are both going to reimburse a good bit lower than someone who wants a quote on a repair who doesn't have full coverage(bc otherwise Geico would just lower their contract to that). It's the same concept in health care and many other fields. If you call up any office just about and ask what the out of network fee will be(from providers standpoint) they will give you a price.
"Con Reeder, unhyphenated American" <constance@duxmail.com>: May 05 09:26AM -0500

> in health care and many other fields. If you call up any office just
> about and ask what the out of network fee will be(from providers
> standpoint) they will give you a price.
 
Are you serious? If you have to call for a price, it isn't
transparent. And none of that flows to the customer in an easily
comprehensible way. On the margins, of course, when you are in
deductible land, there is some incentive to select a lower cost
provider. But you are rarely in a position where you can easily
choose.
 
If hospitals and clinics advertised prices, people could choose
which they prefer on a regular basis.
 
And when every man-jack is sending you a different bill for an x-ray
ordered by a doctor, or a seperate fee for anesthesia, and you had
no input as to the price and method of selection for that vendor, it
is not transparent. And that is the way it is in many situations
involving hospital stays.
 
Until you can get providers advertising all-in prices for an
angioplasty or a knee replacement, and you can select any of them
that meet certain underwriting criteria, it isn't transparent.
 
That is the key; there has to be incentive to shop. For example, you
get people signing up for HMOs knowing that they will have less
choice, just so they can get a lower insurance payment. And if people
can make choices for who they get to do procedures, based on price
and consumer ratings, the tendency will be to try and compete for
that business.
 
--
Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed. -- Francis Bacon
michael anderson <mianderson79@gmail.com>: May 05 06:58AM -0700

And put down deposit on Porsche 718s....
 
Ordered an 18. Will be here towards end of august supposedly.
 
Had to put down 5 percent nonrefundable.
 
Ordered midnight blue exterior and saddle brown interior. Wanted a more light tan color but they stopped making those monotone throughout because of safety glare issues apparently.
 
The options I ordered were to go up to 20s for the wheels, pdk/auto transmission(tested both, liked it much better), full leather interior upgrade, and the midnt blue color.
 
Still going to keep the old Nissan econobox for lomg trips, bad weather driving, etc...may drive the Porsche 3-4 days a week around time.
 
Compared to the Cayman, the 911 base I drove felt heavy. And it has a completely unusable back seat. And was like 20k more.
 
Haven't price out insurance yet....hope it's not too bad.
Mercellus Bohren <mercellusb@yahoo.com>: May 05 07:10AM -0700

On Friday, May 5, 2017 at 9:58:50 AM UTC-4, michael anderson wrote:
 
> Still going to keep the old Nissan econobox for lomg trips, bad weather driving, etc...may drive the Porsche 3-4 days a week around time.
 
> Compared to the Cayman, the 911 base I drove felt heavy. And it has a completely unusable back seat. And was like 20k more.
 
> Haven't price out insurance yet....hope it's not too bad.
 
Nice. Is the seat comfortable for a larger person such as yourself?
"Con Reeder, unhyphenated American" <constance@duxmail.com>: May 05 07:57AM -0500

>> > California is happening in spite of its government.
 
>> And the shrinkage of Kansas is in spite of its government?
 
> It's Kansas. Would you willingly live there?
 
And I don't know what is meant by that anyway. As far as I can tell,
Kansas is in the middle of the pack both on population growth and
GDP growth, and in GDP it is on average growing faster than the U.S.
 
--
The problem with Internet quotations is that many of them
are not genuine. -- Abraham Lincoln
plaidmoon@gmail.com: May 05 06:59AM -0700

Mike, for what it's worth, the CalExit movement has imploded because the guy pushing it has moved to Russia.
michael anderson <mianderson79@gmail.com>: May 05 06:40AM -0700

It's not real celebration....it's kinda like the girl who throws can party with her GFS after the love offer life dumps her because she is now 'free' of him....
dotslashderek@gmail.com: May 04 09:29PM -0700

On Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 10:01:54 PM UTC-5, The Cheesehusker, Trade Warrior wrote:
 
> Would a single payer be more likely to fund this sort of innovation - or a shitload of angry and frustrated consumers?
 
> Put it this way - you know the GLEE people have when they cut their cable cord? Can you imagine the glee from cutting the cord to our current health care/insurance cluster fuck?
 
> Thoughts?
 
First of all - yes - can definitely imagine that GLEE. That's a really good analogy.
 
For your primary question... I think it could go both ways. So, what we're really talking about is comparing the pressure the insurance companies provide VS pressure the government would provide in both the broad context of industry wide innovation and a more specific context around innovation related to increasing access and reducing costs, right?
 
Because the consumers are presumably going to be there providing their pressure regardless.
 
So when I say it could go both ways - doesn't it sort of depend on the temperament of the government?
 
Lol. I'm not sure I like where this is going. Because really, in that situation, the ideal government is one that's fiscally responsible and impossible to corrupt. And you'll never get to either. Theoretically, they'd be able to bring enormous pressure to bear on the market (by being tight with a damn nickel for once) and relentlessly reward cost saving innovations with fair contract processes that spurned the entire concept of a "long standing relationship".
 
Lol. Seems sort of pipe-dreamy.
 
Maybe the ideal government is one with broad and comprehensive safety net measures written in "structurally" run by tightwad libertarians, begrudgingly doling out the absolute minimum cash required to meet their constitutional obligations.
 
Other concerns - you'd need to avoid at any cost the government deciding to "in house" things. In basically any way shape or form. They foot the bill - they don't make the sausage. Which has interesting implications around funding all kinds of things - even really basic research - and where that line is drawn.
 
Interesting questions, dude. Just scratching the surface, I'm sure.
 
Cheers.
"Con Reeder, unhyphenated American" <constance@duxmail.com>: May 05 07:59AM -0500

> cable cord? Can you imagine the glee from cutting the cord to our
> current health care/insurance cluster fuck?
 
> Thoughts?
 
Aetna Prime? I'm in.
 
--
The problem with Internet quotations is that many of them
are not genuine. -- Abraham Lincoln
"Con Reeder, unhyphenated American" <constance@duxmail.com>: May 05 08:03AM -0500


> Thoughtquery - would we have this sort of innovation - driving
> primarily thru profit seeking via disruption - if we had primarily
> public financing of health care costs?
 
No. We'd have turf wars over which companies could most capture
the legislation so that they could benefit.
 
 
> IOW - if we had single payer, would there be pressure/incentive to
> come up with all these potentially new ideas you're hinting at?
 
If it is managed by government workers, they have no incentive
for that. Government workers manage so that they can cover their
ass and lose their job. No risks.
 
> sort of insurance" (Yo, Silicon Valley - opportunity) or vastly
> cheaper high end care, would there be research into ways to make
> this happen?
 
Now we're talking. The highest-quality, lowest-cost in comparison
surgery and health care we have is in areas where insurance and
government doesn't pay, i.e. elective eye surgery, glasses, and
plastic surgery.
 
> Would a single payer be more likely to fund this sort of innovation
> - or a shitload of angry and frustrated consumers?
 
The latter. Make it transparent enough to shop for health care, and
pass the savings on to the consumer.
 
> cable cord? Can you imagine the glee from cutting the cord to our
> current health care/insurance cluster fuck?
 
> Thoughts?
 
Blue Cross Prime.
 
 
--
The problem with Internet quotations is that many of them
are not genuine. -- Abraham Lincoln
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