Digest for alt.sports.hockey.nhl.mtl-canadiens@googlegroups.com - 10 updates in 1 topic

Monday, May 8, 2017

Nyssa <Nyssa@flawlesslogic.com>: May 08 08:44AM -0400

Jim Bauch wrote:
 
> unreliable showboat P.K. than they did with the supposed
> greatest leader-y leader who ever led.
 
> Jim
 
Yeppers, GO PK!
 
As for Weber, I pity the guy since he was thrust into a
situation that was a no-win for him no matter what he did
on the team. Not his fault at all. He's a very good
defenseman, a very good leader, but the sparkle and dash
that was PK simply couldn't be replaced with the fans.
 
He did the best he could do in a touchy situation, so he
deserves a lot of credit for getting through it with his
honor intact.
 
If the Oilers manage to win Game 7 and advance, it's really
a laugh that little DD will be part of the push against
the Preds. He didn't do much in the pile-on the Oilers
did to the Ducks last night, so maybe his star is shining
a bit less with the coach and fans as his true weaknesses
start showing more.
 
It should be a VERY good series either way.
 
Pluck the Ducks! Go Oilers!
 
And a big high five to PK for the next round. Rest up,
because you're going to have your hands full coming up.
 
Nyssa, who now needs the Pens to kick the Caps' butt tonight
Nyssa <Nyssa@flawlesslogic.com>: May 08 08:46AM -0400

Chuck wrote:
 
> playing offence during equal strength or PP. While
> Montreal views an active defence pushing offence during
> equal strength as a capital offence.
 
And it's obvious which works and which doesn't.
 
GO PK!
 
Nyssa, who wonders what scheduling genius has us waiting until
Wednesday for the next Western Conference game
Gerry <gerry14@hotmail.com>: May 08 05:52AM -0700

On Sunday, May 7, 2017 at 10:56:40 PM UTC-4, Chuck wrote:
> playing offence during equal strength or PP. While Montreal
> views an active defence pushing offence during equal strength
> as a capital offence.
 
I wonder if any of the teams advancing to the final four will share the Habs' philosophy. The Rangers were probably closest, although they've had to open it up against the Sens at times, and also haven't received the goaltending they did in Round 1. The Ducks might be, although they have some heavier players and incredibly superior centers. If the Pens, Oilers, Sens, and Preds are going through, that's a lot of teams with more active D, eschewing the conservative risk-averse style.
 
l8r,
Gerry
Gerry <gerry14@hotmail.com>: May 08 05:57AM -0700

On Monday, May 8, 2017 at 8:44:13 AM UTC-4, Nyssa wrote:
 
> on the team. Not his fault at all. He's a very good
> defenseman, a very good leader, but the sparkle and dash
> that was PK simply couldn't be replaced with the fans.
 
And only 9 more years on Weber's contract. I think we all like the guy, but there may be some discomfort at some point as the realization of just what the Habs did there sets in on more fronts.
 
l8r,
Gerry
Chuck <barberphoto411@gmail.com>: May 08 06:16AM -0700

Montreal's approach from the blue line created a logjam of players in front of the net where othe then Weber shots from the point were rarely a threat, and rarely on net. Even with Weber, without the extra space on a PP, they couldn't make his shot a more frequent threat while at equal strength. Plus the poor shooting from the other defence, made the Weber route to the net too predictable. While Nashville's defence across the board was effective at putting the puck on net. Sure there is a higher threat of a blue line turnover, but it pulls the opposition away from the net creating more room for Nashville forwards, more laneways to the net and a less predictable amount of perimeter passing. What did Montreal do to break the pattern? Every once in awhile they'd get away with using the backdoor play
Jim Bauch <j.bauch@ca.rr.com>: May 08 09:42AM -0700

On Monday, May 8, 2017 at 5:57:19 AM UTC-7, Gerry wrote:
 
> And only 9 more years on Weber's contract. I think we all like the guy, but there may be some discomfort at some point as the realization of just what the Habs did there sets in on more fronts.
 
> l8r,
> Gerry
 
I've now forgotten where I saw it -- maybe at Habs Eyes on the Prize -- but someone recently wrote an article along the lines of "don't worry, Habs fans who want a complete rebuild: you'll get it soon enough!" The idea being that, with Weber's deal, and Price and Pacioretty due for new contracts soon, the Habs will have a lot of cap space committed to an aging core of players. You can ask the Canucks what that looks like.
 
Jim
Gerry <gerry14@hotmail.com>: May 08 12:51PM -0700

As usual a lot will depend on what they can pull off in the way of player development in the meantime. From where we are sitting, it probably doesn't look super-optimistic - the prospect pipeline doesn't scream out in abundance.
 
But that said, it's not always evident what the pipeline truly holds. Folks would probably peg the Habs' prospect list in the bottom third of the league, in general. But if you actually did get Sergachev emerging as a top-pairing, defender, if Juulsen landed as a solid citizen, somebody else stepped up and surprised (the new Jerabek?), if they kept Beaulieu and he progressed... well, the D could find itself somewhat secure, with the crusty veteran leadership of Weber to anchor them. Then I actually like the goaltending pipeline with Lindgren, McNiven, and even Fucale. Up front... much dicier to distill optimism, but let's say they kept Radulov long-term and he stayed good, if Lehkonen keeps getting better, Galchenyuk blossoms more fully, and... some other guys exceed expectations... it would have been nice to land even a 30-year old Shipachyov of course... but there could be other diamonds lurking in the rough that they somehow manage to get their hands on...
 
I mean, it's not *impossible* that they can just keep stringing along indefinitely, even shoring up from within. It'd take a lot of things going right. But that's what happens for a lot of teams that do actually perform well over the longer haul. An aging core doesn't *have to* translate directly into a rebuild phase. It could... maybe it _should_... but I can imagine them skipping past it, with luck. If you want to call it luck.
 
l8r,
Gerry
Jim Bauch <j.bauch@ca.rr.com>: May 08 01:01PM -0700

On Sunday, May 7, 2017 at 6:11:00 PM UTC-7, mike wrote:
> You deserve a Stanley Cup and I can't wait to see you with it in Montreal. Ram it down their fucking throats and don't feel one bit ashamed to do so.
 
Jack Todd with some Grade-A trolling in the Gazette:
http://montrealgazette.com/sports/jack-todd-habs-didnt-get-stiffed-with-subban-trade-that-had-to-be-made
 
"But how Subban and Nashville fare in the post-season has nothing to do with the price of tea in China. This was a deal that had to be made and anyone who sees the Man Mountain in front of Carey Price and thinks the Canadiens are worse off having Weber in town is flat out of his mind."
 
Ah, yes. The Man Mountain. All hail the Man Mountain! Yeesh. In a column that takes a lofty, dismissive attitude to the "many fans [who] cleave to [Subban] with a desperation," maybe you shouldn't use fawning nicknames like you're a 12-year-old asking Weber for his autograph.
 
And I would bet large sums of money that, if Nashville had lost in the 1st round the Habs advanced, Todd would be penning an I-told-you-so column explaining how those results were all about Leadership and lecturing us on how Bergevin knew best.
 
Jim
Jim Bauch <j.bauch@ca.rr.com>: May 08 01:02PM -0700

On Monday, May 8, 2017 at 12:51:51 PM UTC-7, Gerry wrote:
 
> I mean, it's not *impossible* that they can just keep stringing along indefinitely, even shoring up from within. It'd take a lot of things going right. But that's what happens for a lot of teams that do actually perform well over the longer haul. An aging core doesn't *have to* translate directly into a rebuild phase. It could... maybe it _should_... but I can imagine them skipping past it, with luck. If you want to call it luck.
 
> l8r,
> Gerry
 
Should I read anything into the fact that you didn't even mention Scherbak as a possible late bloomer?
 
Jim
Chuck <barberphoto411@gmail.com>: May 08 02:43PM -0700

This season the trade was a wash for Montreal. For Nashville they gained a player who supported more offence from their top pairing defencemen. Subban might score a little less then Weber, but Ellis and Jossi will more then cover the difference. Had Montreal kept Subban and the remainder of the defencemen performed the same as they did this season, I think the end result would match what they achieved this season. The trade itself was not a mistake. The stupidity was buying into MT's system, plus MB not making any other moves on defence, they had no pairings who supported each other at the points. Markov did, but age made it impossible to cover the skills the other defence failed to supply. He should have told MT, as much as you hate Subban, I can't trade him because I cannot find a puck moving defenceman to back up Markov. Beaulieu spins his wheels on the development treadmill and both Petry and Emelin have no puck sense when it comes to playmaking. Just changing Subban is a waste if the only move. So, MT if you don't like it, resign
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